Overtime Pay Laws By Company: OT Rules Specific To Companies
Overtime Pay Laws By Company: Overtime Wage Rules Specific To Your Job

Overtime Pay Laws By Company: Overtime Wage Rules Specific To Your Job

Search our Overtime Pay Laws database to to learn about the overtime laws and minimum wage laws associated with a company.

The list below is intended to be a resource to determine if you are eligible to file an overtime pay lawsuit based on your company.

Company
7-Eleven
AAA
AARP
Ace Hardware
Ace INA Group
AIG
Air Canada
Alaska Airlines
Aldi
Allianz of America
Allstate
Amazon
American Airlines
American Insurance
Applebee's
Arby's
Aurora Saint Luke's Medical Center
Auto Owners
Auto Road Service
Autozone
Baja Fresh
Bank of America
Bank of New York Mellon
Baptist Medical Center San Antonio
Barnes & Noble
Barnes-Jewish Hospital
Baylor University Medical Center
Beaumont Hospital
Bed Bath & Beyond
Benihana
Berkshire Hathaway
Best Buy
Best Roadside Service
Best Western
Beth Israel Medical Center
Better World
Big Boy
Big Lots
BJ's Wholesale Club
Bob Evans
Boston Market
BP Motor Club
Buffalo General Hospital
Buffalo Wild Wings
Burger King
California Pizza Kitchen
Candlewood Suites
Cardinal Health
Carl's Jr.
Carolinas Medical Center
Carrabba's
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Champps
Charlton Memorial Hospital
Cheesecake Factory
Chick-fil-A
Chili's
Chipotle
Choice
Christina Hospital
Chubb Group
Cincinnati Insurance
Citigroup
Cleveland Clinic
CNA Insurance
Convergys
Cosi
Costco
Covenant Medical Center
Crowne Plaza
CVS
Dairy Queen
Delta Airlines
Denny's
Dollar General
Dominick's
Domino's
Doubletree
Dunkin Donuts
eCarCare
Embassy Suites
Erie Insurance Group
Farmers Insurance
Five Guys
Florida Hospital Orlando
Foot Locker
Fred Meyer
Fred's Pharmacy
Frontier Airlines
Gamestop
Giant Eagle
Giant Food
Good Sam
Hampton
Hardee's
Hawaiian Airlines
HE Butt
Hilton
Holiday Inn
Home Depot
Hooters
HyVee
IHOP
Inova Fairfax Hospital
Intercontinental
Jack in the Box
Jackson Memorial Hospital
JCPenney
JetBlue Airways
Jewish Hospital
Jimmy John's
Joe's Crab Shack
Johns Hopkins Hospital
JPMorgan Chase
Kaiser Permanente
KFC
Kohl's
Krispy Kreme
Kroger
Lakeland Regional Medical Center
Liberty Mutual
Little Caesars
Longhorn Steakhouse
Lowe's
Macy's
Marriott
Massachusetts General Hospital
McDonald's
Medicine Shoppe
Meijer
Memorial Hermann Southwest Hospital
Memorial Regional Hospital
Menards
Mercy Hospital Saint Louis
Methodist Hospital Indianapolis
Methodist Hospital San Antonio
Methodist University Hospital
MetLife
Millennium
Montefiore Medical Center
Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital
Mount Sinai Medical Center
Munich American Holding
National Motor Club
National Roadside Assistance
Nationwide
Nordstrom
North Shore University Hospital
Northwestern Memorial Hospital
Norton Hospital
Novant Health Forsyth Medical Center
Office Depot
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center
Olive Garden
Orlando Regional Medical Center
Panera
Papa John's
Paragon Motor Club
PetSmart
Pizza Hut
PNC Bank
Ponderosa
Popeyes
Progressive
Publix
Qdoba
Quiznos
Radio Shack
Radisson
Red Lobster
Red Robin
Rite Aid
Ritz-Carlton
Ruby Tuesday
Safeway
Saint Joseph's Hospital
Saint Luke's Hospital New York City
Saint Mary's Hospital
Sears
SEI
Shands at the University of Florida
Sharp Memorial Hospital
Sheraton
Sherwin-Williams
Shopko
Shoprite
Smith's
Sonic
Southwest Airlines
Spectrum-Health Butterworth Hospital
Spirit Airlines
Staples
Starbucks
Startek
Starwood
Stop & Shop
Stream Global Services
Subway
Supervalu
Taco Bell
Tampa General Hospital
Target
Teletech
The Hanover
The Hartford
The Methodist Hospital
Thomas Jefferson University Hospital
Tim Hortons
Transatlantic Holdings Group
U.S. Bank
UAB Hospital
United Airlines
University of Michigan Hospitals
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Presbyterian
USAA
Verizon Wireless
W R Berkley
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center
Walgreens
Walmart
Wells Fargo
Wendy's
Westin
Whataburger
Whole Foods
Wyndham
Yale-New Haven Hospital
Zurich

Can I Receive Overtime Pay?

In addition to federal overtime pay laws under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), many companies have their own separate and distinct overtime and minimum wage laws. Employers who violate these laws are subject to a lawsuit seeking the proper payment of overtime and wages.

Overtime employees are those workers who are entitled to receive overtime pay from their employers under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). This Act is a federal law that requires employers to pay specifically identified workers overtime wages if the employee works more than forty hours per week.

When an employee qualifies for overtime pay, the employer must pay 1.5 times the regular hourly wage.  Many salaried employees are also entitled to overtime pay depending on their job and duties.

Many workers are almost always determined to be overtime employees.  These employees include:

  • Most type of “blue collar” workers or other manual laborers who perform work involving repetitive operations with their hands, physical skill and energy (Examples: Carpenters, electricians, mechanics, plumbers, iron workers, craftsmen, construction workers, longshoremen, and laborers)
  • Most non-management employees
  • Most police officers, state troopers, detectives, paramedics, fire fighters, paramedics, emergency medical technicians and other “first responders.”
  • Parole officers, probation officers, and park rangers
  • Security guards
  • Licensed practical nurses and Registered Nurses (RN)
  • Hospital employees
  • Paralegals, clerical staff, and secretaries
  • Warehouse workers and maintenance personnel

While many employees are entitled to overtime pay, there are certain occupations or jobs that are “exempt” from minimum wage and overtime requirements.   This means that employers are not required to pay these specifically identified workers the minimum or overtime wages.  These “exempt” employees include:

  • Management employees
  • Administrative employees
  • Physicians
  • Lawyers
  • Certain restaurant workers, like waitresses
  • Outside salesman
  • Agricultural workers
  • Farm workers
  • Taxi drivers

The job title or classification is not the determining factor as to whether a worker is entitled to overtime pay. The FLSA and individual state laws establish various tests and requirements to determine whether a worker is an overtime employee, that is, entitled to overtime pay for working more than 40 hours in a week.

Two employees at the same company with similar positions and job duties may be treated separately under the FLSA.  That is, one employee may be entitled to overtime pay and the other employee may not be entitled to those wages.

Our unpaid overtime lawyers will carefully evaluate your job and your work situation to determine whether you are an overtime employee that is entitled to receive overtime pay.

If your employer owes you overtime wages for work performed, even dating several years back, we can file a claim for you to recover the unpaid wages that you are owed.  We will represent you under our No-Fee Promise, which means there are no legal fees or costs unless you receive a settlement.

Can I File An Overtime Wage Lawsuit?

Employees who work more than 40 hours in a workweek and are classified as “non-exempt” under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) are entitled to overtime pay.  If an employer is in violation of the FLSA and fails to pay an employee overtime pay when they are entitled to receive such benefits,  an unpaid overtime lawsuit may be filed.

According to statistics, since the height of the recession in 2008, more workers across the United States have been suing employers under the federal and state wage and hour laws.  In fact, according to an report published in USA Today, the number of lawsuits filed last year was up 32 percent.

The most common reasons why an employee may be able to file a lawsuit for overtime pay include:

  • Being forced to work “off the clock.”
  • Jobs being misclassified as “exempt” from overtime requirements.
  • Work being handled on personal time due to smartphones and other technology.
  • Work hours were averaged over a two week period to avoid paying overtime.

These are just a few reasons why a worker may be able to file an unpaid overtime claim. There are several other numerous reasons and ways an employer may violate the law in order to not pay you overtime wages. You may be getting cheated out of substantial wages by your employer.

If you suspect that your employer is denying you overtime pay, you may be entitled to file a lawsuit.  These lawsuits can provide you with significant compensation for your unpaid wages and often include payment of penalties, liquidated damages, interest, and attorney’s fees. Many overtime lawsuits are filed as class action lawsuits by a group of employees against their employer and you can often choose to join that lawsuit or file your own separate claim.

Who is the Best Overtime Pay Laws Lawyer?

If your employer failed to pay you the required overtime pay or minimum wage that is required in your state, you should contact our experienced overtime pay lawyers to discuss your legal rights. You may be able to pursue an unpaid overtime lawsuit to recover the wages owed to you by your employer.

In many states, you can seek payment of back overtime pay for up to three years in the past and then continue to receive your proper wages in the future. Many courts will award you the attorney’s fees and costs as part of your lawsuit settlement.

Our experienced and qualified team of unpaid overtime lawyers will provide you with a Free Consultation on your claim. If we accept your overtime case, we will not charge any legal fees or costs unless we are successful in winning you a settlement. To get started on your case and to determine if you are eligible to file a lawsuit for overtime pay, call our top rated attorneys today at (855) 754-2795.

Your employer cannot retaliate against you for pursuing a wage and hour lawsuit and if they do, there can be additional compensation awarded to you. We will represent you under our No-Fee Promise, which means you pay absolutely nothing unless we win a settlement for you. If we cannot help you, you owe us nothing.

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